FAQs

How can therapy help?
I’ve never been to therapy, what can I expect?
What does it mean to go to therapy?
Does going to therapy mean I’m crazy?
What happens in a typical session?
What types of problems do you treat?
Do you specialize in anything?
Do I have to talk about things I don’t want to?
Do I have to lay on the couch?
What are the benefits of counseling?
Do you accept my insurance?
How do I get reimbursed?
Why would I pay out of pocket when I have insurance?
Why are you not on Insurance Panels?

How can therapy help?

Going to therapy can help in many different ways. It can give you a safe place to verbalize what you really think and feel.  You don’t have to carry the burden all by yourself. You do not have to be alone with your thoughts and feelings. You might learn that what you are going through is temporary or changeable. You may learn how to better deal with the parts of your life that are not within your control. Therapy can teach you how to change your thinking so that you feel better, alert you to patterns of behavior and teach you new ways to relate and cope. It may awaken, remind and help you build on strengths that you forgot you have. It can help you understand yourself better,  manage your anger, grief, and emotions. Therapy can help you solve problems in your relationships and communicate better. Therapy is very individualized and can help you in the areas you struggle with the most.

I’ve never been to therapy, what can I expect?

The first step in coming to therapy is to set up an initial appointment, sometimes called an assessment. At that time, I will welcome you to my office, which is set up like a small living room. Most people comment that they feel comfortable and at home in the office. No you don’t have to lay on the couch, unless you really want to! We will discuss how therapy works, and we will both sign forms pertaining to confidentiality, and our responsibilities in working together.

We will discuss how therapy is a very personal process. Generally speaking though, your first appointment is an introduction to the therapist and a time of information gathering.  It is an opportunity for you to assess whether you feel comfortable with me. A good fit is vitally important in developing an effective helping relationship.

After the initial assessment, regular sessions are scheduled based upon your individual needs. We typically begin with weekly sessions, to jump start the process. Then sessions are gradually decreased until you no longer need therapy. The goal of therapy is to help you, teach you and support you. We will write a treatment plan which states your goals (what you want to get out of coming to therapy) and how we will achieve them. When you have achieved your goals or you feel you no longer need the support, you are discharged. Or, over time, we identify new goals and work towards those. Treatment is centered around you, progresses at your pace, and is focused on what you want to be better or different.

What does it mean to go to therapy?

It means that you recognize that you would benefit from some educated, professional, experienced help. It is actually a sign that you are aware of what is happening in your life and that you want things to be better. Instead of the “same ole, same ole” you want change, and some fresh ideas of how to get there.  Kudos to you.

Does going to therapy mean I’m crazy?

This in one of the most common questions I am asked. No, you are not crazy. More people than you know seek the help and support of a therapist. Unfortunately, people just don’t tend to talk about it.

What happens in a typical session?

Generally, we will start by talking about your week and how you feel. We start gently, until you feel comfortable delving into the more personal topics. We then spend time working on the issues that you identified in your treatment goals. Finally, we wrap up and talk about what you are going to try and work on between this and the next session. The work of therapy is not just in the session, but in the work you do between sessions.

What types of problems do you treat?

I see people who want help. The problems they present are different. I have experience helping people with depression and anxiety.  I have worked with lots of people who feel overwhelmed, or are tired of dealing with drama.  I have helped people dealing with grief and loss of loved ones. I have helped a great deal of parents who are struggling with how to help their child, couples/parents who are divorcing, and the children struggling with their parents’ divorce or new boyfriends/girlfriends.  I have experience with individuals who self injure.  Mood swings, panic, relationship issues, problems with anger, list goes on. If you have a question about whether I have experience with your issue, just ask!

Do you specialize in anything?

I see clients who want help. These range from children to adults of all ages, 8-88! My passion is working with teens and young adults. I have extensive experience and am able to quickly build trusting relationships with young people and their families. I understand the issues of being a teenager today and what it is like to go out in the world.  It’s tough. Together we figure it out.

Do I have to talk about things I don’t want to?

The short answer is no. Therapy is based on your goals and happens at your pace. Often times, though, therapy can become uncomfortable or unpleasant, because we talk about things that are distressing. For example, you might describe unpleasant feelings or painful memories that are affecting your current thoughts, feelings, and/or behaviors. It is in reprocessing these that you feel better and move beyond them.  Knowing this may occur, you determine the rate and pace of your therapy. We go there when you are ready. Therapy is not forced upon you.

Do I have to lay on the couch?

Absolutely not. The type of therapy that you are thinking of is called Freudian or psychoanalytic, the kind you see in the movies or on TV. Therapy at BOTC is more like entering a comfortable living room and talking about what’s happening in your life and what’s bothering you.

What are the benefits of counseling?

You get out of therapy what you put into therapy. Therapy can help in many different ways. It can give you a safe place to verbalize what you really think and feel. You may find out that you are not the only one who feels as you do, or has experienced what you have. You might learn that what you are going through is temporary or changeable. You may learn how to better deal with the parts of your life that are not within your control. Therapy can teach you how to change your thinking so that you feel better, alert you to patterns of behavior, and teach you new ways to relate and cope.  It may awaken, remind and help you build on strengths that you forgot you have. It can help you understand yourself better,  manage your anger, grief, and emotions. It may help you to understand your child, siblings or parents better. Therapy can help you solve problems in your relationships and communicate better. Therapy is very personal and can help you in whatever areas you struggle most.

Do you accept my insurance?

Although I am not on insurance panels as a “preferred provider”, many insurance companies will cover our sessions as an “out of network provider”. I have an LCSW, the clinical license required by insurance companies for reimbursement. If you would like to be reimbursed by your insurance company for counseling services, I will provide you with the necessary information to file your own claims. Please also note that if you have a healthcare flexible spending account, therapy services are considered covered medical expenses.

How do I get reimbursed?

I suggest that you contact your insurance company prior to attending sessions to get information on  what mental health services are covered by your specific policy and how to seek reimbursement. Some of the questions you might ask are: Do I have out-of-network mental or behavioral health benefits? Do I have to meet my deductible before using out-of-network benefits? What is my deductible and has it been met?

Why would I pay out of pocket when I have insurance?

Some families choose not to use insurance. Using your insurance requires that you be diagnosed with a mental health condition, such as depression, anxiety, or adjustment disorder. Often times you may not be struggling with a mental illness but need support to navigate an issue or change in your life. Privately paying will avoid being diagnosed with a mental health condition. It will also keep your records private.  Additionally, insurance companies will not cover couples counseling, unless one person is diagnosed as above.

Why are you not on Insurance Panels?

I respect my clients’ confidentiality. This means that I choose to allow my clients to decide who has access to their personal information. Using insurance allows the insurance company access to therapy notes, summaries, and/or diagnoses. This means that you are labeled with a clinical diagnosis, sometimes unnecessarily. Finally, as a private arrangement, you and I will decide how long you will be in therapy rather than an insurance company dictating treatment length and goals. This makes your therapy solely about you.

Comments are closed.

All content ©2020
Back On Track Counseling · 16 North Franklin Street Suite 100, Doylestown, PA 18901 · Phone 267-935-9262
· RSS Feed · Log in